Sarah Prom, MA, LPC, ODCP

Sarah Prom, MA, LPC, ODCP
Sarah leads the Service Delivery Team for VITAL WorkLife and serves as a Senior Consultant and Practice Lead for our organizational clients. She has more than 15 years of counseling, coaching and mediation experience. Sarah has trained nationally and internationally and has expertise in the areas of team development and facilitation, workplace stress and conflict management, relational issues and emotional intelligence. Sarah received her Master of Arts in Counseling from the University of North Dakota, is a licensed Professional Counselor, a Certified Transformative Mediator, an Organization Development Certified Professional (ODCP) and serves on the leadership team at VITAL WorkLife.
Find me on:

How to Cultivate Healthy Care Teams and Eliminate Risk

With more and more medical care being delivered by teams made up of physicians, nurses and other professionals, intrateam cooperation and communication are becoming as crucial as diagnostic and treatment skills in giving quality care, maximizing the patient experience and saving lives. One study shows more than 70 percent of [...]

Read More »

What Really Matters to Millennials in Medicine Today

With nearly a quarter of physicians in some specialties under age 39,1 millennials are beginning to make their mark on American medicine. Their age group has experienced criticism, in and out of medicine. The terms “entitled,” “lazy” and “self-absorbed” crop up regularly in journalistic assessments. And the impact of [...]

Read More »

Appropriate, Inappropriate and Disruptive Behavior by Physicians: Some Official Definitions

When it comes to the behavior of physicians, the lines between what’s appropriate, what’s merely inappropriate and what is genuinely disruptive are not always easy to draw. Here’s how the Model Medical Staff Code of Conduct, developed by the Organized Medical Staff Section (OMSS) of the American Medical Association, explains [...]

Read More »

How Big a Problem Is Disruptive Behavior by Physicians, and What Can Be Done?

When a physician engages in disruptive behavior, defined by the AMA as “verbal or nonverbal conduct that harms or intimidates others to the extent that quality of care or patient safety could be compromised,” the ripple effect of the behavior can be extreme and the results quite dire, according to studies.1

Read More »

How To Successfully Manage the Obstacles of a Disruptive Physician

When Physicians Lash Out Medicine is a high-pressure environment. It’s also an ongoing-learning environment where more experienced physicians are expected to show younger colleagues best practices and share their expertise with colleagues in allied fields, like nursing. Sometimes the high-stakes, high-speed, life-or-death [...]

Read More »

VITAL WorkLife Growing with Two Additional Clinical Leads

New Clinical Leads I am I am very excited to introduce two new Clinical Leads, Gary Barnes and Stephanie Sherman, who are joining our Physician Intervention team! Our Physician Intervention program supports physicians who are struggling with performance and/or disruptive behaviors, so they can regain their well being. As [...]

Read More »

10 Ways Your EAP Can Support You as a Parent

Parenting Are you having challenges with parenting? Do you struggle with setting boundaries for your children? Do you have doubts about your abilities to raise a successful child? Here are 10 ways your VITAL WorkLife EAP (Employee Assistance Program) can support you as a parent.

Read More »

How to Talk to Children about Bad News

Children get their news from many sources and these are not always correct. How do you talk about bad news, and listen to your children’s concerns in times of crisis?

Read More »

How to Cope in the Aftermath of Witnessing a Traumatic Event

Our thoughts go out to the victims and survivors of the mass shooting at the Route 91 Country Festival in Las Vegas. It is difficult — if not impossible — to understand what would compel someone to cause such devastation to so many innocent people — and we may never truly know the reasons why. Witnessing a traumatic event — [...]

Read More »